Archive for October, 2010

[Quick Update] Heading for Ordos, Inner Mongolia for the Weekend

Ordos, Inner Mongolia? Never heard of it? I will be here. It’s my first time into Inner Mongolia and it should be about a ten hour over night train ride from Beijing. According to TIME Magazine Ordos is the Modern Ghost Town so it should be perfect for Halloween. I will be back with more updates on Monday.


[Transportation] China has the Fastest Shinkansen (Bullet Train in Japanese)

I’m sure by now you’ve seen posts from all over the web saying that China has the fastest bullet train in the world,  running at a speed of  245mph compared to the 186mph Japanese Shinkansen, which previously was the fastest before China overtook the Shinkansen in 2008 with the opening of the Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway. I had the opportunity to ride the Chinese Bullet Train from Beijing to Tianjin couple months ago and I must say I was extremely impressed.  From Beijing to Tianjin is about 117km in distance and it only took about 30minutes. The ride was comfortable as the Japanese Shinkansen, or even better and the interior was spacious enough to take a brief nap but again, 30 minutes wasn’t long enough for my nap.  The total cost one way was about 70rmb (about 10USD) for first class coach. With the record breaking traffic jams in Beijing, it’s nice to see more means of transportation being complete all around China.

The world’s first maglev also belongs to China running at  a max speed of 268mph connecting Shanghai Pudong International airport and the outskirts of central Shanghai. I finally had a chance to ride it couple weeks back and not only the speed but how comfortable it was really amazed me. Japan Railways announced recently that they will also be completing a maglev style bullet train with max speed of 312mph, aiming for commercial use in 2027, which is still a while away. But as an observer, it’s interesting to see how quickly China has caught up and passed Japan in this field. Considering 20 years ago, nobody could compete with the Japanese Bullet Trains in speed, efficiency, and safety.  For more comparision on comparative literature on high speed transportation, the Transport Politic did a great job analyzing “High Speed Rail in China”.

at Beijing South Subway Station waiting for the Bullet Train.

a Bullet Train is ready to leave Beijing towards Tianjin. It runs almost every 30minutes from Beijing South Railway Station

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Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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[Photo] Beijing’s Underground City

What fascinates me about this great city of Beijing is that the more you try to know what’s going on in this city, the more unknowns you run into. Couple weeks back some friends and I were having a conversation about the Underground City in Beijing. A city created in the form of tunnels under the city of Beijing. This to me was unheard of. In Chinese its called 地下城(DiXia Cheng). It’s sole purpose was to be a bomb shelter created in the 1970s in anticipation of nuclear warfare with the USSR. Since 2000 to 2008 it has become a tourist destination but for the last few years the gates have been shut down for renovations. I’m really curious to see what it’s like down there below. It cover a total of 85 square kilometers. I know that there are a total of 90 gates in the city. Even around my apartment I feel like the shady basement entrances could lead to the underground city. Will be back with more updates soon on the underground city.

Could this be one of the 90 entrances to the Underground City?

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[Photo Essay] Saturday Afternoon in Gulou

Gulou is the area surrounding Drum and Bell towers mainly with Hutong style housing which is currently under the threat of redevelopment programs which are mainly the construction of transportation centers in the area. This photo essay is my walk through of Beijing's beloved old city.

 

Rickshaw drivers rest as they await for customers. Drum tower in the background.

Rickshaw drivers ride back to the Drum towers. Most of their income comes from tourists. This day it was mainly French tourists who didn't feel like walking around the Hutongs.

Girls hanging out on the swings?at the park on a Saturday afternoon. Drum tower in the background

Elders meet on a daily basis to play mahjong. They didn't seem to mind the cold wind that day.

Rickshaw drivers were everywhere in Gulou that day. Weekends are busy days for these drivers.

Girls busy on their phones, on the way home from school.

Students heading home from school.

Rickshaw drivers taking French Tourists around for a ride.

A dog walks by. Dogs tend to be unleashed in China. Chinese people love their dogs here.

Looks like someone had a party last night. The local beer Yanjing Beer seems to be the popular choice around here.

Biker cycles past a green sign that asks for citizens to cooperate in the Census program that is taking place right now in China.

A worker is seen through the walls. The north side of Gulou is already destroyed and a transport station is supposed to be built to compliment the ever growing population and transportation efficiency.

On Gulou Da Jie. Construction can be seen at every corner of Gulou.

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[Power Dynamics] Joseph Nye on Power Transition and Power Diffusion

I ran across a great TED Talk from former US Diplomat and Harvard Kennedy School of Government dean, Joseph Nye.

Some topics he discussed in his talk were:

Power Transition Vs. Power Diffusion
Not rise of asia, but the Return of Asia. Power shift to Asia.
China passing US economy in 2027(projected by Goldman Sachs) isn’t a percapita measurement hence, one dimentional overlooking the complex issues.
Asia is not one thing. View of rise of China is different depending on where you are in Asia.
“We(US) don’t have to fear the rise of China, as long as we we have policies to manage this change”
Power is multipolar – US, EU, China, and Japan can balance each other
Soft power is becoming more and more important.
How do we work together create global public goods on positive sum but not zero sum?

I think Dr. Nye did a great job analyzing power from many different perspectives in the 15minutes that he presented. It’s correct, China may surpass the US in terms of GDP by 2027 as China has already passed Japan this year but you have to look at economic power from the per capita perspective. According to World Bank data, it still takes on average  13 Chinese citizens to produce as much as one Japanese citizens GDP.

But I really liked how he said  mutual cooperation and understanding each countries national interest as well as creating a positive gain, will be a key to creating smart power. A very optimistic but an inspiring 15minutes.


[Sino-Japanese Relations] Recap of Sino-Japanese Relations: September to October

Let’s look back at the major events that happened in the last 2 months span between Japan and China. This is the most tension these two neighboring states have experienced since 2005.

9/8/2010 Collision between a Chinese fishing vessel and the Japanese coast guard near a chain of disputed islands.
9/16/2010 Death of a Giant Panda in Japan loaned by the Chinese government.
9/20/2010 The arrest of four Japanese construction company employees at a Chinese military site.
9/20/2010 China cancels 1,000 Japanese youths visiting the Shanghai Expo.
9/21/2010 China cancels the ticket sales of Japanese boy band Smap’s first ever concert in Shanghai.
9/27/2010 Japan asks China to pay for boat damages from the 9/8 incident.
10/7/2010  Japan complains to China on their difficulty to import rare earth resources.
10/20/2010 Ironically, Japan welcomes China for the 10th anniversary of the military exchange program.
10/25/2010 China cancels their attendance to 23rd Tokyo International film fest concerning over the naming of the event’s Taiwanese delegation.

As a result of these actions and reactions by the two states, Japanese tourism to China has dropped significantly. Heavy distrust between the 2 states have grown dramatically in the past couple weeks. Of course, we also witnessed protests in both countries:
10/16/2010 2,000 Japanese protesters marched Saturday to the Chinese Embassy in Tokyo.
10/23/2010 Anti-Japanese protests in Sichuan, China.
10/26/2010 Anti-Japanese protests in Chongqing, China.

There were other protests in China as well, but from the trends it seems like the Chinese government is doing a lot better job controlling the protests as the most recent ones in Lanzhou and Baoji were controlled by local officials before the demonstrations expanded into larger groups. It is said that most of these protests are organized through online groups which enables protesting to happen much efficiently and jointly as we have seen through the Honda labor strikes. It was interesting to see how in some of the latest protests in China, while some were shouting slogans slamming Japan and to boycott their products, some people also raised banners criticizing Chinese Communist Party rule. One called for the introduction of a multiparty political system. Another berated the government for the high cost of living. Many people have fallen victim of this dispute as a Japanese school in Tianjin was attacked and Japanese owned businesses and Japanese restaurants were hit hard by angry protesters. But it is ironic since most of these restaurants are Chinese owned and personally, they hold no ties to Japan. I asked a couple Japanese restaurant owners in Beijing if the last couple months have affected their business and they said they said they have fewer people coming in to their restaurants.

What is effecting such public opinion is the more interesting topic of debate as education in both states clearly list in their history books that the controversial islands belongs to them and nobody else. The unfortunate incident happened in the sea territory of dispute over both state’s sovereignty which stirred the events listed above in the last couple months.  I understand there’s mixed reactions to all this but what really hit me was Yoshito Sengoku, Japan’s chief government spokesman statement “The ball is in China’s court” and Japan currently must remain calm. Japan relies heavily on the booming Chinese tourists for its economic recovery. China seems to have more say and control in the relations as we have seen in the past couple months. Japanese citizens are angry about the outcome but Japan currently has to stay calm as any move to anger China will have a longterm damage  on the 2 states bilateral relationship, which Japan doesn’t want at the present. It will be interesting to see what will happen in the following months to come before the Asian Games are getting ready to boot up in Guangzhou China.

Nonetheless, the two countries need each other in the economic field and as I have said over and over, lack of interaction between actual Japanese and Chinese people have stirred such emotions and comments to each other being influenced heavily by popular media and propaganda history books from both sides. At the moment, the 2 states have been playing power diplomacy as both states want to stay as the ‘older brother’ in terms of Confucian relationships as China passed Japan as the second largest economy while Japan has been struggling politically and economically internally as the yen continues to be strong.

Japanese Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara’s interview with WSJ covers the basic views from Japan as well.

Picture taken at Japan Pavilion at Shanghai Expo, even with rising diplomatic tensions, the Japanese Pavilion remained one of the most popular destination)

Picture taken at Japan Pavilion at Shanghai Expo, even with rising diplomatic tensions, the Japanese Pavilion remained one of the most popular destination

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[Photo] Man vs. Car

Picture taken in  Dongxindian. Located one hour east from central business district in Beijing. This area witnessed a bunch of taxi’s being repaired. Mostly migrant workers live in this area.

Dongxindian is a hub for repairing Beijing Taxi's

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[Development] Compassion for Migrant Children

This weekend is almost about to end but it was a rather fresh weekend for me in the ever cooling city of Beijing. Friday witnessed a rather early sleeping time and this was so that I could get up early at 6am. Saturday I woke up at 6am, got ready and headed out for 五元桥Wuyuan Bridge. Now, if you’re a local here you might be asking me WHAT THE HELL WERE YOU DOING IN WUYUAN QIAO!!? Wuyuan Bridge is all the way out in the 5th inner ring road which is pretty far from  the center of Beijing. It took me almost 2 hours to get out there: taking the metro, bus and by walking. Where was I headed for in Wuyuan Qiao? I made my way finally to a School in the middle of  no where. Starting this weekend, I have decided to make more use of my time here in Beijing than just the usual going out and wasting my time on the weekends recovering from the night before. I joined a NGO called Compassion for Migrant Children(CMC), which the organization stands to help migrant children in China by further expanding their education by means of using volunteers like me.

China has many social problems but as of now the massive migration of workers moving into larger cities, like Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, is one of the largest problems China faces. Here are the stats for Beijing according to CMC:

50,000,000 Migrant Workers in Beijing as of now

500,000 Migrant Children in Beijing.

These are overwhelming numbers and is continually growing at a rapid rate. The problem is that these Migrant children aren’t registered in Beijing since they come from other provinces in China so they do not have the proper access to public education in China.  They do go to school but these migrant schools have poorly educated teachers and overall, the children don’t receive the proper care and advise they require. Most of the migrant children face a reality where they watch their parents work day and night and some drop out of school and start working at a very young age. That’s the situation in a nutshell and I promise I will be back with more statistics and info for future posts.

As far as Saturday went, I realized that I haven’t taught English for almost 3 years when I taught for a private English institution in Wuhan, China for the summer. But this experience was quite different. I wasn’t teaching for money and I was just doing it for the pure enjoyment of wanting to make an impact and learn at the same time. The school was a very simple and even though it lacked many resources the joy of the students and the energy they brought to class took over any negativity in the environment or what the children were going through. I only taught for 2 hours, mainly to grade school students but I really enjoyed it. I will be doing this for the next couple weeks until Christmas. For now, this is all the time I have to update on my experience but I will have a photo essay dedicated to the status of Migrant Workers and their family members by the end of the year! Stay tuned.

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Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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[Music] Creators Project x Beijing

This should have been posted a while ago but the Creators Project was in town last month. Showcased at the 798 art district.  From their website: “The Creators Project is a new network dedicated to the celebration of creativity and culture across media, and around the world”. Beijing had a real treat that night as everyone enjoyed free drinks all night long and performances from Diplo and Major Lazor.

 

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[Photo] Summer is over and that means Winter is here in Beijing

I remember moving into my new apartment in Beijing and I would rush to my room and turn on the air conditioning immediately to avoid the heat that Beijing was experiencing. This was about 2 months ago. Today, I was freezing and no wonder, it was about 10 degrees celsius outside. Summer is long gone and here comes the winter season in Beijing that I have been dreading about. So what happened to Autumn? I think we had Autumn weather for maybe about a week if not less from the end of September to the first week of October. For recent events, the company I work for moved its office to Hanwei Plaza which is another large business complex in Beijing. It doesn’t really effect my traveling time to the office but I was able to walk a different route to capture another face of one of my favorite buildings in Beijing: that of course is the CCTV tower. You can see the building that burned down in the background.

 

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[Quick Update] gokatayama.com gets a New Look

I decided to change the theme for gokatayama.com. Hope you all like it!

Upcoming trip: to Ordos in Inner Mongolia for Halloween Weekend. There’s a so called modern ghost town there so it should be perfect for my first Halloween experience in China. Whats the hot costume this year in the states anyways?

Make sure you check out my photography page as well as my music page with my monthly mixes.


[Photos] Top 5 Photos from Seoul

I finally got around to posting my favorite shots from my Seoul trip from back in September. It was a nice get away from Beijing. The city reminded me mostly of Tokyo for its efficiency in transportation and access to many things that I was blocked from in Beijing, like internet and western food. Since I took 1,000 photos all together from this seven-day trip, choosing 5 photos was  a tough task. I tried to choose a photo from different genres. But as efficient and smooth Seoul was, I really missed Beijing for what it is. The more I travel outside of Beijing, the more thankful I am for what I have in Beijing. Seoul was delicious and it was interesting to see North Korea with my own eyes from the DMZ. Here are the top 5 photos. Enjoy!

Picture #1: I could not help but to take a photo of this little girl at Gyong Buk Gong Palace. Her facial expression shows how she was annoyed by her mother taking a picture of her over and over. This week was during Chuseok, the national holiday in Seoul and you could see many people dressed up in traditional Korean outfits. What distinguishes Japan and Korea in traditional wear was the bright colors that could be seen in Korea. During Chuseok, aka Korean thanksgiving, people go home to their hometown so some of the restaurants and shops in Seoul were closed.

Picture #2: I had a romantic afternoon with three of my guy friends where we witnessed where couples "lock" their love at Seoul tower. We took a cable car up the hill and we saw the sunset. This shot was taken from Seoul Tower and although I can't read Korean, I'm guessing it says something similar along the lines of "You are my destiny" or "We will be together forever" or something like that. But nonetheless it was a great place to overlook the entire city of Seoul.

Picture #3: By now I hope you have realized that I am a big fan of blue sky's in my photography. This one came out well because of the great contrast. This photo was taken at the Korean War Memorial, which is a must go if you are in Seoul. Seoul Tower is on the top right corner of this photo as well.

Picture #4: Also taken at Gyong Buk Gong Palace. During Chuseok, you could see many events going on around the city. Kids were painting masks and you just gotta love the creativity and the colors.

Picture #5: This was taken at a park right by City Hall in Seoul. The architecture of the traditional style buildings are quite similar to the ones in Beijing or Tokyo but I just like this photo because its chill and that was my goal for this trip. I just wanted to chill and relax and that's exactly what I did in Seoul.

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[Shanghai Photos] m50

Shanghai is known for its rather artsy feel and one example of that is the art district called m50. M50 gets its name from Moganshan Road 50. What I feel is most interesting about this region is the walk to the actual gallery. There are tons of graffiti art that can be found along the way. Artists from around the world leave their mark drawing their own graffiti art.

 

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[Shanghai Restaurant Review] Extraordinary venues to impress in Shanghai #2

Back again for Venue #2 and this could conclude the “Extraordinary Venues to Impress in Shanghai” Series. The second venue is in Pudong and its the skybar within the Ritz Carlton. Located on the 58th floor, Flair was a great place to check out the city of Shanghai turn from day to night. The sunset was gorgeous. Check out the photos I managed to come out with.

I’m so ready for the weekend, I’ll be busy teaching English at migrant schools and catching the Boys Noize concert on Saturday. I’ll be back with more photos from Seoul, which I have meaning to post for ages.

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[Shanghai Restaurant Review] Extraordinary venues to impress in Shanghai #1

On my last day in Shanghai last week my friend took me to a couple of venues with one of the most breathtaking views of Shanghai. Now, I’ve been commenting a lot about Shanghai these days but don’t get me wrong. I’m a Beijinger at the moment and Beijing has a lot of astonishing views as well. One of places in Shanghai we went to is:

New Heights Shanghai: Located at Three on the Bund, this superb location from the 8th floor allows for one of the best views of the bund. I really recommend the lunch set menu for 118RMB which comes with an appetizer, main course and a drink of your choice. The outside patio area is a really nice to spend the afternoon, of course when the weather is good. I’ll let the pictures do the talking from here.

Picture #1: The View from the table. Good food, good view what more can you expect from an afternoon meal.

Picture #2: Compared to seeing the Bund from below, it gives off another feel to see it from up top. During Guo Qing Jie, the street from Nanjing East Road to the Bund was filled with tens and thousands of tourists from around China and the globe so it was cool to get away from that.

Picture #3: View to the North. You can see another fabulous restaurant, M on the Bund in the building right across.

Picture #4: View to the South. You can see the newly built apartments in Pudong.

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[Restaurant Review] Megaburger, What a Real Man Eats

Without further introductions, just take a look at the size of this 5pound megaburger from the Butcher’s Steakhouse in Beijing. Are you ready to take on China’s largest burger?

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[Shanghai Photos] Shanghai World Expo, Better City Better Life

So I’ve been meaning to put up these photos from the World Expo, but to be honest, I’m sure that by now we’ve all seen or skimmed through  pictures of what each of the Pavillion looks like. It’d be boring if I just posted pictures of the pavilions so instead I’ll just post pictures of what I thought the Expo represented to me with my thoughts. As I have said earlier, Shanghai had changed a a lot in the last year and a half since I last studied there. Most of the changes were made due to the Expo and the image that the city along with what China wanted to portray to te foreign tourists and Chinese people from outside of Shanghai. The makeup of the audience when I was there was heavily Chinese. I say 90% Chinese 10% foreigners. It was to a point where I felt relieved to hear some English. I didn’t bother to line up for 5-8 or whatever hours it took to see some of the popular pavilions so I decided to head in to the ones with the shortest wait. Those pavilions were the following:

UN Pavilion, Pavilion for international organizations, and small pavilions that only had pictures hanging on the walls and a message from the head of the government.

I encountered an interesting situation when I tried to enter the Japanese pavilion. The line was already a 4 hour wait so I rushed to the side to see if there was anyone that spoke Japanese. It was the day when the Chinese boat captain was released from Japan and returned to China. It was interesting to see how yet so many people in line wanting to see the Japanese pavilion as Diplomatic tensions still took place. Soon enough, I found out that the Japanese student Ambassadors were wearing something like this so it wasn’t too hard to spot them. I asked if I could enter without waiting in line and the girl, who looked exhausted yelling and telling Chinese visitors to remain calm and not to push people in line, told me that would be possible. So as I was about to enter I could feel hundreds of Chinese people in line stearing at me with rage. The very next moment a Chinese guard came up to me and told me to wait in line. His explanation was that it wasn’t fair to the people who have been waiting. At that point I looked over to the girl who said yes to me and she told me that I should follow what the security guard told me. It was an interesting situation to be in nonetheless of the political situation during that week between Japan and China.

To me, what was most interesting was how there were so many student volunteers within and outside the Expo. Everytime I would ask a security guard a question in English, they would always point me to a student volunteer who would speak decent English or a third or fourth language added on to that.

Overall, I didn’t have the greatest time of my life at the Expo but I could generally see how the Chinese people were full of excitement to explore and see different cultures. You can’t feel or understand what the country is all about by just going to the pavilion but its a great way to see all the different pavilions coming together and making this great event. I was just exhausted after 3 hours of walking. The Expo is HUGE! I think if you can get through 5-8 pavilions you’re in good shape. My personal favorite was the UN pavilion since I didn’t have to wait and I actually got to talk to UN officials about their job and what they wanted to portray at the Expo.

One last note that I have to talk about is the Expo Passport. For every pavilion, there is  a special stamp that you can get on your Expo Passport. Now, I don’t know how cool stamps are these days but the Expo stamps were somewhat of a status where I witnessed people fighting over stamps and even taking off without looking at the pavilion right after they got the stamp, which was sad, but the people who had to stamp everyone also has a tough task of staying awake.

Here are some of the photos I came out with.

Picture #1: Guards holding back visitors outside the Japan Pavilion. Most people go on to other pavilions after hearing that the wait is4 hour wait but some had multiple day passes so that they could see all the pavilions. The guards have a long day as well as the workers and student ambassadors at the Expo.

Picture #2: Inside Cambodia Pavilion. Pavilion visitors await anxiously to get there Expo Passports stamped.

Picture #3: At the UN Pavilion. Most visitors didn't have time to stop by and look at the 8 Millinium Development Goals that the UN has set up.

Picture #4: A lady sits and rests amongst the other visitors walking by her. Many people carried around their own chairs already prepared for the long wait.

Picture #5: China Pavilion. Great weather.

Picture #6: Chinese flags were everywhere in Shanghai that week for Guo Qing Jie.

Picture #7: Expo student volunteers did a great job helping people with directions and tips on which pavilions to check out.

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[Photos] Streets of Shanghai

Before I start talking about this group of photos I chose to post, the air in Beijing today was amazing the AQI dropped from high 400s to about double digits today which was really nice. The rain came from no where yesterday. I enjoyed some really good steak yesterday for a monthly Charity event(I will be posting more about this later).
But for today’s post I wanted to post some street pics from Shanghai. During the Expo, or should I say after 2 years since I left Shanghai, this city has changed a lot. Compared to Beijing most roads are nicely built and it was very comfortable to live. One can easily feel that Shanghai was the doors to the west during the Expo. All the street food vendors were gone and my beloved Nanjingxilu Street Food Street was also taken down. Some of the largest pirated DVD shop streets were gone as well. To top it all, the air quality in Shanghai was really good. Most people tell me that this is due to the fact that Shanghai has been burning Australian high quality coal instead of the ones from Shangxi province, which makes a large difference in a city this big. Ill be putting up Expo photos, tomorrow.

Picture #1: I wanted to focus on the design of the tiles for this shot. It was taken in Times Square in Shanghai by People's Square. This is where are the big spenders come to shop and so you can see a lot of fashionable people. This was a cloudy day but I think I got my message through this shot.

Picture #2: Walking west from Times Square towards Xintiandi area you'll see Shanghai's newest Apple store. It's hard to believe that there's only a handful of Apple Stores in China. i also wanted my attention to go towards the Police officer navigating the busy intersection as cars pass by.

Picture #3: Taken at the Expo Village in Pudong. The workers and student ambassadors from all over the world were given nice housing during the Expo. I think shanghai Architecture and the designs inputed into the modern apartments are really interesting. This was a photo that I had to take.

Picture #4: Is much lively as it was taken at People's Park. During national holiday, there was a lot of people in the park just chilling, playing games, or even parents looking to match up their sons and daughters with potential candidates. It was interesting to see elders ride the swings as well.

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[Photos] My hand and Pudong

These are some random shots I took of my hand and the Shanghai World Financial Building (aka the Bottle Opener) and JinMao Tower in the background. Great weather made this photo interesting. As far as Beijing weather goes, I don’t think it could be any worse than today. It’s polluted and I bet that if you are wearing a brand new white shirt today in this weather, your shirt will be black by the time you get home. More pictures from Shanghai to come including World Expo stories and Photos from around the city.

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Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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[Quick Update] You can check out my photography on Chinadaily!

I was supposed to put up the rest of my photos from Shanghai last night but I didn’t realize how I tired I was until I found myself sleeping on my desk at around 10pm.  But as a quick update, China Daily has finally put up my photos from Beijing! You can check it out by simply clicking here.

I wonder when the pollution is going to go away..

 


[Photos] Shanghai during GuoQing Jie

After 6 full days of Shanghai, I am back in Beijing. My flight back was relatively comfortable compared to a what could have been a disastrous 13 hour train ride back packed with all the Beijingers and migrant workers. The first thing I noticed as I set foot on Beijing was the air. Pollution here we come. Shanghai’s air was way better than in Beijing as we all know but it was interesting to see how Shanghai had changed after a year and a half. I’m gonna be writing more about Shanghai and the Expo along with thoughts from my Seoul trip throughout this weekend but for now, enjoy three pictures I took from Shanghai. I’ll be putting up more of my work soon. Let me know if you would like the original files for these photos. I have work for the next 7 days straight thanks to Chinese work scheduling for this month.

Picture #1 is the bund(外滩) at night from Puxi side looking at Pudong. I was mad that a boat passed by during my shot but I actually like the boat in this picture as it adds an interesting feel to the photo.

Picture #2 is the China Pavillion at the World Expo. I didn't get to go in but this powerful building really stuck out to me the most. During GuoQing Jie(National Holiday) in China national flags could be seen everywhere in the Country.

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Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at gokatayama.com.


[Monthly Mix] Will be in Shanghai for a week so everyone gets free music

Hey all,I know I haven’t posted anything from my Seoul Trip but I’m going down to Shanghai for a week starting tomorrow. I’ll be staying with my good friends from when I studied abroad at Fudan University back a year and a half ago. I’m excited to see how much different the city is now after I last left. This week was a busy week at work and I’m ready for my vacation. Unfortunately, I’m not the only one in China who has a 7 day weekend. From tomorrow to next Thursday is China’s National holiday or in Japan we would call this Golden Week. Everyone is most likely going to Shanghai. But as far as music goes, I have 2 updates. Check out this new video from Duck Sauce called “Barbara Streisand“. It’s gotta a catchy beat and the video highlights all the big to upcoming artists in todays music world. The video is definitely worth watching.

Also I made a 40minute mix for all you dance lovers. Its a short mix but has all my favorite tunes from the last month. Listen to it on my download page or click here. Hope everyone is doing well and Happy Holidays from China!

gowhere? October Dance Mix

Click Here for the Tracklist

Here’s the “Barbara Streisand” Video from Duck Sauce.
http://www.dailymotion.com/swf/video/xezqx0_duck-sauce-barbra-streisand_music?additionalInfos=0
Duck Sauce "Barbra Streisand"
Uploaded by foolsgoldrecords. – See the latest featured music videos.