Posts tagged “Hutong

[Photos] Wudaoying Hutong: The Next Nanluoguxiang

With all the construction taking place around the Gulou area in Dongcheng District, Beijing and  with the new  subway line planned to run through the old city, I can’t help but to notice all the changes being made all around this area. Wudaoying hutong, located right by Lama Temple Subway station is another project; similar to the Nanluoguxiang hutong, this hutong is slowly transforming into a much more commercial themed hutong. If you walk along the street, the exterior is accompanied by  hutong style architecture but the interior is occupied by trendy boutiques and cafes serving up western food. I walked by Wudaoying two weeks ago and it already looked a lot different from what I could remember from last year.  The entrance to the hutong from the Lama Temple side looked as if it was almost complete. Here are some photos I snapped from Wudaoying hutong entrance.

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[Photos] Construction Around Nanluoguxiang

Living in China is definitely one of the best choices I have made thus far in my life. Coming from a Japanese background and heavily influenced by American culture, China is the perfect place for me to play around with my lost roots and observe and feel what Japanese people have lost over the years through the daily activities of the Chinese people whom I witness. But just like every corner of the world, income gap prevails and is seen in Beijing. Behind the blue construction fences are migrant workers working day and night while the rest enjoy their shopping along side Nanluoguxiang. Photo taken at the south gate of Nanluoguxiang, one of the most well-known commercial and touristy Hutong in Beijing.


[Event] DJ GOWHERE at if Bar Saturday Night


[Photos] Getting Lost in Gulou

One of my favorite locations in Beijing is Gulou in Dongcheng District. I enjoy walking along the hutong’s observing the interaction of local people and the close community that they live in. I really don’t mind getting lost at all but this past weekend, I was heading for the Drum Tower and got lost in the hutong’s around Gulou. You’d think that it’s a straight road leading to this tower from the photo below but I ran into constant dead ends and had to rely on local people to tell me which way to go.

I should have looked at the street signs that clearly says "Dead-end ahead"

Most Dogs in Beijing are usually unleashed.


[Photo] Wired

China’s online population is already the world’s largest and is continuing to expand with a year on year increase of 40%+.  This is just my observation but when comparing Tokyo JR Yamanote subway Line and Beijing Subway Line 1(the busiest public transportation means for both countries) during morning rush hours, I rarely see people in Beijing glancing over the printed newspaper as much as I would see in Tokyo. It seems like a majority of people in Beijing prefer means of internet to surf the news. Again, the demographics on who takes the subway in Beijing is different from that of Tokyo. We also can’t overlook the difference in the cost of living between Japan and China as a majority of people in Japan will take the subway for its efficiency and low cost as opposed to  in China where income gap is on a larger scale, most high income people in Beijing will unlikely take the 2RMB(about 30US cents) subway ride to work but rather get stuck in the world’s busiest roads just because they can afford a car.

Wired in. Photo taken at Hutong in Gulou.

Creative Commons Licence
Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at gokatayama.com.


[Photo] Chinese Longevity

I really enjoy walking around Lama Temple on the weekends. Here, you can  see so many things that make you feel like you are in China. Since I spend most of my time in the central business district, it’s really nice to get out and walk around the hutong. I found these peach-looking objects with a chinese character on it. This character 寿means longevity in Chinese and you can find this character all over China within people’s houses. We can all agree that a long, healthy, prosperous life is one of the most admirable and highest goals of humanity and especially in China longevity is something that is valued highly. The peach is not only a symbol of longevity but it comes from an ancient story of the fruit that enables immortality which this peach of immortality can only be planted every 3000 years.


Creative Commons Licence
Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at gokatayama.com.


[Photo] Growing up in Gulou

Photo taken in Gulou right by Drum Tower. Growing up, I think Hutong communities are the perfect playground for kids.

Creative Commons Licence
Go Katayama – Photojournalist in Beijing by Go Katayama is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at gokatayama.com.